Calling it an example of "restrained extravagance," the Buick Velite concept is the first American demonstration of GM's all-new Zeta global vehicle architecture (its sister car, the Opel Insignia, was Zeta's International debut at the 2003 Frankfurt Motor Show, last year. Named for an elite class of quick-moving soldiers in Napoleon's army, the Velite was designed in GM's Advanced Studio in Warren, Michigan, and assembled in Italy by reknowned coachbuilder Stile Bertone. Building from Buick's rich design heritage, the long hood opens forward and integrates three portholes on each side, while a complementary rear deck opens rearward to swallow the Velite's folding soft top. Power is provided by an experimental twin-turbocharged intercooled 400-hp/3.6-liter V-6 engine backed by a Hydra-Matic 6L80-E six-speed rear-wheel drive automatic transmission with manual tap-shift gear selection. Inside, Buick uses sumptuous materials, gold-leaf lacquer, and indirect lighting to evoke a rich, elegant atmosphere that matches its romantic yet contemporary exterior design.