Note: Vehicles pictured are European-market 2008 BMW 335d and X5 3.0sd

Oil-burning BMWs are coming to the U.S., and they're coming packed with plenty of technology. Two models -- the 335d and X5 xDrive35d -- will arrive on our shores in late 2008 after making their debut later this month at the Detroit auto show. Both are designed to meet the stringent Bin 5 emissions standards and will be sold in all 50 states, according to BMW. Pricing will be announced at a later date.

Powering both vehicles will be a variant of the automaker's 3.0-liter twin-turbo inline-six that makes 265 horsepower and an impressive 425 lb-ft of torque. The engine will reportedly propel the 335d from 0-to-62 mph in 6.2 seconds and the X5 xDrive35d from 0-tp-62 in 7.2. BMW expects the 335d to achieve 23 mpg city and 33 mpg highway, with the X5 xDrive35d achieving 19 mpg city and 25 mpg highway -- both substantial improvements over their gasoline counterparts.

Although the engine's power is down slightly from its European version, which has an output of 286 horsepower and 428 lb-ft of torque, that model is not fitted with BMW's new emissions control system, which allows it to meet the U.S. regulations. Called BMW Advanced Diesel with BluePerformance (a much more complicated name for a system similar to Mercedes-Benz's BlueTec), the emissions control system consists of a standard oxidation catalyst housed in the same unit as a particulate filter, which has been placed right after the exhaust manifold.

The system also features a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst with AdBlue urea injection designed to greatly reduce nitrous oxide and other diesel particulate emissions. The AdBlue system stores the urea in an active tank with a capacity of 1.6 gallons as well as a passive tank of 4.5 gallons. BMW says the combined tank capacity means it will only have to be refilled at the same time as an oil change. AdBlue refills will be included in BMW's free maintenance program.

Like its German competitors, Mercedes-Benz (Daimler) and Volkswagen, BMW is a major player on the diesel scene and has been producing diesel engines since 1983, although this is the first time the automaker has brought a diesel model to U.S. shores. Diesel models account for some 67 percent of BMW's European sales. With both Benz and VW bringing 50 state diesels stateside in 2008, BMW obviously did not want to be left out in the cold should diesel-powered vehicles catch on here. Also expect to see a diesel-powered X6 come stateside at some point.