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The 10 Tools Everyone Should Own

How-To: Build Your First Tool Kit

Jason Thompson
Dec 1, 2011
Photographers: Jason Thompson
Ask 10 mechanics what their favorite tool is, and you’ll elicit 10 different responses. That’s what we discovered when we visited multiple service shops to bring you some real-world insight. One thing we discovered on our toolbox expedition was no two collections are the same—they are all very personal, and each of them is constantly evolving. For example, we found traveling mechanics like to keep their tools in multiple boxes instead of having a large and heavy stationary one. Since a technician’s tools are so intimate, many mechanics hesitated to speak with us because they don’t like giving up their trade secrets. While on the other hand, some technicians’ eyes lit up, and they couldn’t wait to spill their guts. Here’s Diesel Power’s 10 must-have tools. To submit your top 10 favorite tools, send us an email at Jason.Thompson@sorc.com.
Photo 2/13   |   the 10 Tools Everyone Should Own tool Chest
1. Sockets Many mechanics like to designate a drawer solely for sockets. Your impact, deep-wall, short-wall, 12-point, 6-point, hex and Allen, metric, and standard sockets of all sizes are easily found if they are kept in order. High-quality, American-made sockets are a lifetime investment, which can be passed down from generation to generation.
Photo 3/13   |   the 10 Tools Everyone Should Own sockets
2. Ratchets & Accessories Ratchets, extensions, torque wrenches, and swivels of all sizes are also best kept in a single drawer.
Photo 4/13   |   the 10 Tools Everyone Should Own rachets
3. Battery-Powered Impact Gun This is one of those tools that once you buy one, you won’t know how you got along without it. We especially like our ½-inch corded impact that we recently purchased, because sometimes you just don’t have access to an air compressor.
Photo 5/13   |   the 10 Tools Everyone Should Own battery Powered Impact Gun
4. Specialty Tools If you don’t have one of these spindle-nut sockets in your toolbox, expect to have to make an auto parts store run soon. Even if you don’t have a solid-front-axle truck, more than likely a friend in need will. Pull one of these out at the right time and you’ll be transformed into an instant hero. Other hero-type tools include disconnects for removing fuel and air conditioning lines, and tubing wrenches.
Photo 6/13   |   the 10 Tools Everyone Should Own spindle Nut Socket
5. Gasket Scrapers These come in many different shapes and sizes. We also enjoy the kind that accepts razor blades—your fingertips will thank us later.
Photo 7/13   |   the 10 Tools Everyone Should Own gasket Scrapper
6. Wire Brushes & Wire Wheels If you live in the Midwest, you might as well buy a whole bunch of the cheap wire brushes to get the first couple of layers of crud off—then just throw them away. Then to finish the job, specialty brushes from Brush Research are a great timesaving investment. Wire brushes are sold for specific applications, and good brushes feature wires that won’t come off as easy as the cheap ones. Make sure to invest in a good angle grinder, too.
7. Pullers & Presses This is a pitman arm puller, and it works much better than a pickle fork since it won’t damage the boot. You can use one of these on steering joints or anything else it’ll grab. It’s a good idea to have a whole host of models and sizes: two-arm, three-arm, and steering-wheel type. These are needed to remove pieces with a tapered fit: steering knuckles, drive gears, and belt pulleys. The more expensive ones can be rented as needed.
Photo 10/13   |   the 10 Tools Everyone Should Own puller
8. Hammers The hammer is probably the most useful tool ever created. A 5-pound steel sledge with a shortened handle is our favorite, but sometimes the job calls for something softer, like a brass or plastic dead blow.
Photo 11/13   |   the 10 Tools Everyone Should Own hammer
9. Picks A heavy-duty pick like this will quickly become your best friend. It’s critical for helping to line up heavy parts before you install fasteners. The smaller, dental-style versions are also useful.
Photo 12/13   |   the 10 Tools Everyone Should Own pick
10. Scan Tool Today’s technicians must be just as proficient with a computer and diagnostic trouble codes as they are with a ratcheting wrench. If you only deal with mechanical diesels, you’ll still have to work on the occasional electrical problem, and the Power Probe III is an easy-to-use, extremely helpful tool that allows you to check the condition of your alternator and battery, power up components to see if they work, and find short circuits.
Photo 13/13   |   the 10 Tools Everyone Should Own power Probe

Sources

Mac Tools
Westerville, OH 43082
800-622-8665
www.mactools.com
Lisle Tools
Clarinda, IA 51632
712-542-5101
http://www.lislecorp.com
Tork Teknology
616-298-9103
http://www.torkteknology.com
Makita
714.522.8088
www.makita.com
Snap-On
800-255-7011
http://www.snapon.com
Brush Research
323-261-2193
http://www.brushresearch.com
Monaco Tool Company
541-689-8579
http://www.monacotool.com
Power Probe
800-655-3585
http://www.powerprobe.com
SK Hand Tools
800-752-7263
http://www.skhandtool.com

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