Senior editor Ron Kiino recently commandeered the largest-in-fleet Tundra for a big-time move. "I took the Toyota home for the first time, so I could pick up a queen-size mattress and box spring from Sam's Club. By angling the bed setup along the rear window, both pieces fit no problem, and I used the fixed tie-down hooks to secure them with rope." With the view out the rear window completely obstructed, Kiino says the "gargantuan sideview mirrors finally came in handy." Not so handy are the dash-mounted radio controls, whose far reach, says to copy editor James Dryden, is "waaaaay over there and hardly user-friendly."

Truck Trend editor Mark Williams concurs with Dryden-"Makes for an awkward reach to change radio stations or media modes"-and also notes that the Tundra's myriad cubbies are arguably overabundant: "All the storage compartments are nice, but at what point do a bunch of little closets that don't get used become a waste of space?" Williams, not entirely smitten with the Toyota's interior, does appreciate its robust powertrain: "I'm still impressed with the guts of this 5.7-liter engine, and the six-speed automatic is a strong player, making the Tundra fun to drive around town, especially when downshifting-quick and smooth is the only way to describe rowing up or down through the gears." Of course, one downside to a big engine in a big truck is big fuel consumption-so far, the Tundra is failing to average 14.0 mpg and, as Williams observes, "I wish the tank were bigger, because on my last fill-up the computer readout told me my range was only 293 miles. It should be outlawed for a vehicle to have less than a 350- or 400-mile range, even if it's only getting 14 mpg."


2008 Toyota Tundra
Months/miles in service 6/10,842
Avg econ/CO2 13.8 mpg/1.41 lb/mi
Unresolved problems None
Maintenance cost $92.37 (oil change/inspection/rotate tires)
Normal-wear cost $0