Whatever your opinion on the Accord Crosstour's styling, you have to agree it's practical. As copy editor Zach Gale explains, "Not everyone who needs all-wheel drive wants a CR-V. When you're looking for a Honda with cargo space and AWD, the Crosstour serves its niche nicely. I found the Crosstour to be a comfortable highway cruiser." But there are some tradeoffs, as he continues: "The steering could use more feel, but that could be easily changed in an upcoming refresh. Unfortunately, the Crosstour's gigantic blind spots cannot, and, for me, that's a deal-breaker." He was impressed with the Honda's rear-seat legroom, which is notable, considering his 6-foot, 4-inch frame, but was disappointed with the sloping roofline's effect on rear-seat headroom (for the same reason).

Testing director Kim Reynolds is fond of the Crosstour. "It's well made; I like the materials; it's quiet for a Honda (for an Accord) and nicer-riding; and the extra room in back -- as well as its folding-seat flexibility -- is most welcome."

It seems that in the world of the strange-looking problem-solvers on the road today, the Crosstour tends to appeal to older drivers. Gale notes, "I parked the Crosstour near a Toyota Venza after a road trip to San Francisco and thought of [art director] Mike Royer's comment on the Honda feeling more mature. The Toyota is clearly trying to impress a younger audience, with our short-term test model's dark orange paint and 20-inch wheels (19s are the smallest size available)." It's not flashy and it's not a race car, but it does the job. It's just unfortunate that there are so many compromises.


Our Car
Months/mi in service 14/26,085
Avg econ/CO2 20.9 mpg/0.93 lb/mi
Energy consumption 161 kW-hr/100 mi
Unresolved problems None
Maintenance cost $288.83 (2-oil change, inspection, rotate tires, 1-replace rear differential fluid)
Normal-wear cost $225.92 (replace front brake pads, resurface front brake rotors)