I will admit, I didn't get to drive the Silverado too much over the past month. Sure, there was a day here and a day there, but I didn't get to enjoy the HD as a daily driver for a while. Why, you ask? Because I went on a few trips, which meant dealing with the stress of airports, the TSA, and airport transportation. The trips were fun -- I got to drive the Rubicon trail, one of the toughest, most beautiful trails in the world -- and I had the chance to drive some great cars for a Motor Trend comparison story. But while I was away, the Silverado HD continued to work, serving as torquey moving van for two different staffers. One helped his family, the other did a last-minute favor for a friend who was relocating to a new city.

And, as has been the case all along, the Silverado was more than up to the task. It had plenty of room for all of the gear the guys were moving. They also needed to transport people at the same time, and discovered that when they had each filled the truck's bed to capacity and had to put some boxes in the cab, there was still plenty of space for people. Both also commented that it was a very quick truck, both loaded and empty. One shortcoming continues to rear its head, though -- the lack of a spray-on (or even plastic drop-in) headliner. The lack of that one key feature has led to several scratches in the bed, which does make the truck look like a truck, but can also make those areas more vulnerable to further damage.

It and I worked separately, in different parts of the state (and in some cases, in different parts of the country), but had a pleasant reunion earlier this month. As I've mentioned before, our long-term fleet system has changed; now, we're each assigned a vehicle and we treat it as if it's our own. So, when I got back into "my" pickup after a too-long absence, I was greeted by a familiar friend. You know what your car smells like, you know what your car's driver's seat feels like, you know exactly where all the controls are without looking at them. You know the odd quirks about your car. For some, it's that you have to hold the clutch in longer than with other cars; that the passenger-side window works when it's hot out, but not when it's cold; or the glovebox pops open at seemingly random times. That was the same case here. When I got back into the Silverado, it was as if I'd never been gone. The reunion was instant, and everything was how it should be once again. The "character lines" the truck has gotten during our time with it make it unique, that you have to eject an iPod when pulling it out of the cab makes it a rarity, the easy-to-use controls serve as a welcome respite from those of other vehicles, which seem to make ergonomics difficult for no good reason. It's like getting out of a rental car on vacation, and knowing you're home again, in your truck.

2011 Chevrolet Silverado 2500 HD
Months/mi in service 5/5832
Avg econ/CO2 14.1 mpg/1.59 lb/mi
Energy con 241 kW-hr/100 mi
Unresolved problems None
Maintenance cost $0
Normal-wear cost $0