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  • Road Test: 2005 GMC Envoy SLT vs. 2004 Ford Explorer XLT vs. 2005 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited

Road Test: 2005 GMC Envoy SLT vs. 2004 Ford Explorer XLT vs. 2005 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited

Stars and Stripes Shootout

Scott Mead
Jun 6, 2005
Photographers: John Kiewicz, Jeremiah Scott
On the pages before you are some of the finest midsize SUVs on the market: Ford 's best-selling Explorer, the GMC Envoy (Motor Trend' s 2002 SUV of the Year), and the freshly revised Jeep Grand Cherokee, a former version of which took home the North American Truck of the Year award in 1999.

Putting these heavy hitters together, several editors spent a few days on - and off - road, took them to the test track, and checked 'em stem to stern. When the dust settled, there was a lot to learn and a few surprises we didn't expect.How did these all American bad boys of SUV compare? Keep reading.
GMC Envoy
Creature Comforts
On-Road Dynamics
Off-Road Performance
Cool Stuff

Ford Explorer
Creature Comforts
On-Road Dynamics
Off-Road Performance
Cool Stuff
Jeep Grand Cherokee
Creature Comforts
On-Road Dynamics
Off-Road Performance
Cool Stuff
How They Stack < /b>
Check out the final results of the Stars and Stripes Shootout
Powertrain
GMC Envoy

What is It?
GM 4.2-liter Vortec inline-six 275 horsepower/275 pound-feet 4L60-E four-speed automatic

What We Like
The General's spunky I-6 has a near-linear torque curve, once the rev counter crests 3000 rpm. From a standing start, initial acceleration's a bit soft, a direct opposite from the hammer blow delivered by the Jeep's Hemi V-8. Inline-sixes are generally smooth runners, and this power head is well balanced from idle throughout the powerband. The transmission has smooth, yet positive shifting, and gear-holding on grades was near perfect.
Photo 2/13   |   GMC
What We Don't Like
With its competition running an additional two cylinders, the editors expected a larger spread in EPA numbers, but the Envoy bettered the competition by only a couple mpg. Maximizing pulling torque requires high revs, and the 4200 Vortec gets buzzy at the upper end of the tach. Manually downshifting the tranny on downhill grades, the 4L60-E is a bit slower to engage than we prefer, and GM could step up to the plate with an extra cog for better flat-freeway fuel economy.
How It Works
Introduced on the Chevrolet TrailBlazer and GMC Envoy in 2002, this powertrain was a departure from the then-standard V-6 fare. Inline-six engines have been around for decades, and, for the most part, are powerhouses for their displacement. The 2400 Vortec is no exception, providing velvet smoothness with refined power and offering better fuel economy over V-8s. GMC offers a 5.3-liter V-8 option on the XL edition of the Envoy, one we'd vote to have available on the standard model. As the saying goes, there's no substitute for cubic inches, and when towing or carrying a heavy load, the Envoy would benefit from two additional cylinders.
Powertrain
Ford Explorer

What is It?
Ford 4.6-liter Modular V-8 239 horsepower/282 pound-feet 5R55W five-speed automatic

What We Like
The 4.6 Mod motor brings a refined combination of smoothness and power to the table, and we especially enjoy its long linear torque curve. There's plenty of grunt to pull a decent-size camper, and its SOHC valvetrain makes this a deep-breathing V-8. Having five gears allows the Explorer's engine to loaf at highway speeds, and with overdrive off, keeping trailer speeds at the double-nickel isn't a problem.
Photo 3/13   |   Ford
What We Don't Like
To be blunt, the Explorer's tranny is just about the worst part of this vehicle. During our evaluation, we were unimpressed with a transmission that continually hunted through the gears when under load; would free-spool when feathering the throttle, then slammed into gear as power was applied; would again free-spool for nearly five seconds when manually downshifting (allowing the SUV to gain momentum when engine braking was what was needed); and felt like it was absorbing a good portion of the 4.6-liter's power--something we've experienced with other Explorers. Also, if the engine developed its torque at a lower rpm, it would help the Explorer's acceleration when pulling a load.
How It Works
Ford's family of overhead-cam engines are known for their smoothness and eagerness to rev long and hard, and the 4.6-liter V-8 carries on that tradition. With its tall gearing, the V-8 doesn't even turn 2000 rpm at cruising speed, but stand on the throttle to pass a slow-moving vehicle, and the V-8 leaps into action. Ford's gem of an engine was unfortunately masked by its flaccid transmission. As Editor Mark Williams penned in the Explorer's logbook, "I can't tell if I should be impressed with the 4.6 V-8. I get the sense much of its power is being hidden by the trans."
Powertrain
Jeep Grand Cherokee

What is It?
Chrysler 5.7-liter Hemi V-8 330 horsepower/375 pound-feet 545RFE five-speed automatic

What We Like
Passing a slow-moving vehicle is a dream in the 2005 Grand Cherokee: Step hard on the throttle, and the gearbox almost instantly drops a couple of cogs and the Hemi thrusts you into your seat. The engine's multidisplacement feature also is a plus: it drops a few cylinders when in cruise mode and is quick to activate the entire octet when power is needed. Kudos to Chrysler for putting in a five-speed with the AutoStick manumatic function, which permits near-instantaneous downshifts when the driver deems a lower gear's necessary. The slush box's range of programming is excellent: Shifts are strong and authoritative when under full throttle, yet sedate and mannerly when driven with a light touch.
Photo 4/13   |   Jeep
What We Don't Like
Fuel economy isn't the Hemi's strong suit. For example, feathering the throttle on the highway, the best mileage the Jeep could muster was barely 16 mpg. Driving a mix of highway, city, and mountain roads brought in a 12.8-mpg average. Dipping a foot into the throttle, well, you could practically watch the fuel gauge drop. The 5.7 could use more grunt in the upper rpm band--it starts to wheeze around five-grand--and the AutoStick was a bit slow to respond to downshift commands.
How It Works
The 5.7-liter Hemi may be a thirsty traveler, but having 375 pound-feet of twist at the touch of a toe is a wonderful feeling. When we added weight to the cargo area, the G.C. merely shrugged it off as routine. Like any hi-po V-8, there's some lope in the idle, and the exhaust note draws the attention of nearly all vehicles that pull beside the Grand Cherokee. The Hemi and 545RFE tranny is a great combo, so long as you can afford to fill the fuel tank.
Creature Comforts
GMC Envoy

What is It?
Four-door, five-passenger midsize SUV. Notable features on test vehicle: dual-zone climate control, multiselectable four-wheel drive with low range, seat heaters, rear climate controls, HomeLink, multifunction steering wheel, OnStar, cargo-area air compressor, headlamp washer, XM Satellite Radio, and rear DVD-entertainment system.

What We Like
Adding a touch of luxury, the eight-way driver and passenger seats make it relatively easy to find a comfortable position, and the adjustable lumbar support is a spine coddler. There's plenty of headroom for the entire group, and all of our editors appreciated the XM Satellite Radio. GMC also has done an admirable job at keeping the cabin quiet, even over rough terrain.
Photo 5/13   |   GMC
What We Don't Like
Welcome to the rolling migraine: There are myriad surface textures that are supposed to match but don't and are all vying for attention. The dashboard air vents appear as afterthoughts, and the fake wood trim looks as though it was ripped from a Ranger bass boat. The front seats are fairly flat and are in need of additional side bolstering. The front-passenger seat's a tough pill to swallow if you're tall, as the bottom portion of the hard plastic center stack flares into the leg well (right where your knee would normally rest), necessitating the passenger to either endure a sore left knee or twist his torso toward the door. Other objections: when the front cupholder's in use, it blocks access to the 4WD switch; and the rear bench seat is as flat as a park bench and offers minimal thigh and lateral support. Want a rear armrest? Bring a pillow from home.
How it Works
When the Envoy was introduced a few years ago, its interior design was edgy and a good twist in its day. Now, however, the design is already beginning to look dated, and the combination of hard- and soft-touch materials doesn't mix well--especially the air-vent pods that look like blatant afterthoughts. True, it won the Golden Calipers, and it was the best of the best when it made its debut, but it's in dire need of freshening.
Creature Comforts
Ford Explorer

What is It?
Four-door, seven-passenger midsize SUV. Notable features on test vehicle: Puddle lamps, adjustable pedals, all-wheel drive, rear climate control, and reverse sensing system.

What We Like
When driving long distances, having a deeply padded seat is worth its weight in gold, and the Explorer's captain's chairs deliver in spades. The back seat also is supportive and was a favorite on this test, with good leg-, knee, foot, and headroom. An added plus: a fold-flat third-row seat that'll accommodate two kids in a pinch. Some may think the interior's design is a bit staid, but its uncluttered design and simplistic controls won the editors over, and the large dials and buttons will be appreciated in the winter months, when gloved hands tend to make small-button selections a near-impossible task.
Photo 6/13   |   Ford
What We Don't Like
There's a lot of hard plastic in the cabin, and the door panels could've been trimmed in soft-touch materials--the rock-hard plastic makes arms and elbows sore after a few miles on the road. We aren't sure if the interior designers at the Blue Oval were trying to mimic carbon fiber or a bad leisure suit, but the plastic trim on the center stack and door panels is downright ugly. And you can save the $510 on the stereo upgrade: some transistor AM radios sound better. Our tester's seats were trimmed in leather, albeit industrial grade that sharply resembled vinyl from a 1966 Mustang.
How It Works
Like a family vacation, a Truck Trend test travels over hundreds of miles and to several destinations, albeit in a few days instead of weeks. That said, we truly appreciate seats that don't leave backsides aching, arms numb, and legs tired. Ford almost did it right: The seats are comfy for the long haul, but some of the hard plastic pieces left editors searching for jackets, pillows, or anything with an ounce of padding. Having a third row of seats is great when you need them in a pinch, but if they're used often, don't expect to have any real usable cargo area for a long trip.
Creature Comforts
Jeep Grand Cherokee

What is It?
Four-door, five-passenger midsize SUV. Notable features on test vehicle: automatic and lockable four-wheel drive with low range and neutral, stability control, dual-zone climate control, heated front seats, SmartBeam headlamps, rear DVD-entertainment system, engine-block heater, DVD-based navigation system, Sirius Satellite Radio, tire-pressure monitor, and multifunction steering wheel.

What We Like
Jeep knows a thing or two about building supportive seats, and the dual front chairs are no exception. Both serve up excellent support with manually adjustable lumbar, deep side bolsters, and firm thigh support. Big thumbs up for the clean faceted center stack that leaves all of the controls easily accessible, the excellent color and grain matching between the hard- and soft-plastic items, and the chrome accents and plastic wood trim that adds an air of luxury. Designed to be a true family vehicle, cubby storage spaces are abundant, and the optional rear entertainment center will keep kids occupied for miles. There's plenty of headroom for all, and the AM/FM/six-disc CD/MP3/Nav stereo system sounds as if it was tuned for Carnegie Hall.
Photo 7/13
What We Don't Like
Rear-seat occupants may think they've been placed in the steerage section: The aft couch offers limited leg-, knee, and toe room. The back seat also is mounted extremely low to the floor, so much so that anyone six-feet and taller will ride with his chin resting upon his knees. And, unlike the Ford and GMC, our tester didn't have provisions for rear-seat climate control.
How It Works
The interior on the previous-generation Grand Cherokee was well thought-out, but this new iteration raises the bar a few notches. DaimlerChrysler has hopscotched Ford in the finishing of hard plastic panels that look as though they're molded soft-touch, with color and grain pattern-matching that's near perfect. The driver and front passenger will find their seats comfortable for long stints, but you couldn't pay us enough to ride from Los Angeles to Las Vegas in the back seat. Filled with cubbies, cupholders, and power points, the Grand Cherokee's interior is almost a living room away from home.
On-Road Dynamics
GMC Envoy

What is It?
Double A-arm independent front suspension with struts and anti-roll bar/ five-link solid-axle rear with shocks, anti-roll bar and electronically controlled air suspension. Hydraulically assisted rack-and-pinion steering. Four-wheel disc brakes with ABS.

What We Like
Long highway jaunts in the GMC are a dream. A consummate pillow barge, nary a large road irregularity is transmitted to the cabin, and the optional rear air suspension keeps everything on an even keel, even with a loaded cargo area.
What We Don't Like
Soft. Floaty. Elastic. All are appropriate adjectives to describe the Envoy's Novocaine-like suspension. At the track, senior road-test guru Chris Walton drove the Envoy through the slalom like a 14-foot Bayliner caught in a turbulent sea--crashing down on its suspension at every gate, tail wagging in search of traction. Similarly, the steering also felt as though it had recently seen the dentist. Road feel is minimal at best, accompanied by more slop than there should be. Emergency braking allowed a clunky ABS to rear its head, as the Envoy darted left and right with the system's pulses. The Michelin Cross Terrain tires may have been whisper quiet on the pavement, but presented marginal grip in the twisties and sub-standard off-road performance.
How It Works
For the masses that'll use the Envoy as a daily kid hauler and weekend lugger, GMC's midsize SUV will fill the bill. On the other hand, if you're used to a vehicle providing a sense of road feel and steering feedback, the Envoy will lull you to sleep.
On-Road Dynamics
Ford Explorer

What is It?
Double A-arm independent front suspension with struts and anti-roll bar; double A-arm independent front suspension with struts and anti-roll bar. Hydraulically assisted rack-and-pinion steering. Four-wheel disc brakes with ABS.

What We Like
Add an independent rear suspension to any vehicle that once had a solid axle, and you'll see an instant improvement in handling. The current-generation Explorer proves it on the pavement, as the Ford handles smooth corners with ease and provides a compliant ride, without requiring its occupants to invest in kidney belts. The XLT's steering is sharp, and turn-in is spot-on. The Explorer's suspension tuning was the harshest of the three, but on the open highway, it's good to feel what's happening underfoot. Kudos to the tire engineers that chose the BFGoodrich Rugged Trail T/A tires: They may be noisy on-road, but deliver tenacious grip on wet roads. Fitted with four-wheel disc brakes and ABS, the Explorer had the best binders in the test.
What We Don't Like
When cornering hard, the tightly wound suspension exhibited more bumpsteer than an import tuner car. Choppy road surfaces only made the situation worse, compromising directional control. In the trucking lane, the Explorer bounced riders around like Jiffy Pop, and had a few editors checking for loose fillings after driving on a washboard-like surface. And while the Explorer outbraked the competition, we were nonplussed by the spongy-feeling pedal.
How It Works
In its day, the Explorer was king of the hill, but as other fresher product is introduced to market, it's been relegated to midpack status. True, the AWD version of the Explorer is marketed for those who'll see nothing more extreme than a graded dirt road or snow in the wintertime. That said, it wouldn't hurt Ford to fit this sport/utility with a softer set of springs and stiffer shocks, which would eliminate pothole tremors to the interior and help keep it planted in the corners.
On-Road Dynamics
Jeep Grand Cherokee

What is It?
Double A-arm independent front suspension with struts and anti-roll bar; five-link solid-axle rear with shocks, anti-roll bar. Hydraulically assisted rack-and-pinion steering. Four-wheel disc brakes with ABS.

What We Like
On-road manners are vastly improved, and the vehicle now feels firmly planted to the road. The brakes were easy to modulate, and ABS-assisted stops were string straight. On nasty surfaces, the Jeep was the vehicle of choice, as it literally floated over washboard roads and didn't bash its occupants when traversing deep ruts.
What We Don't Like
This iteration of the Grand Cherokee is far more stable than the previous generation; nevertheless, there's too much body roll when taking the corners hard and the steering's still as numb as a wood post. The standard-issue Goodyear Wrangler SR-A tires may have provided good grip off-road, but they howled in protest on twisty mountain roads.
How It Works
Jeep suspension engineers have a fine line to balance: How to tune a suspension that's stout, can tackle the harshest terrain, and will offer a compliant ride on-road that handles well on mountain roads. This suspension represents a job well done. Compared with its previous generation, this G.C. has better poise in the corners and exhibits less body roll. It soaks up potholes and squelches big-rig-abused highway. Cruising the freeway, it's as smooth as your daddy's Cadillac. On the trail, there's plenty of suspension articulation to please the most diehard of rockcrawlers, and it floats over pock-marked trails. The Jeep typifies the term "get 'er done."
Off-Road Performance
GMC Envoy

What is It?
Autotrac 4WD system. Modes offered: 2WD, Auto 4WD, 4WD-Hi, 4WD-Lo.

What We Like
If you live in the Snow Belt, the security of automatic 4WD engagement in snow or icy conditions can sometimes mean the difference between retaining momentum and getting personal with a snowbank. Traveling over a rocky trail or traversing loose shale, you'll appreciate the locking 4WD system that doesn't have to think about when or where to send power, plus having a low range that provides plenty of grunt to get over steep trails or pull a loaded boat up a launch ramp is a big plus.
What We Don't Like
The Auto 4WD is slower to respond to wheelslip than the Explorer's system, and the drop-tip exhaust is over-exposed to off-road hazards and can easily take a beating (or folding) on a trail. Since the Envoy rides at a comfortable height for easy ingress/egress, we really have to question the need for runningboards that'll catch every obstacle, while muddying your pantleg whenever you get in or out of the vehicle. As one editor commented, "You can either take them off or rip them off. Your choice."
How It Works
For soft-road and snowy conditions, the Envoy's automatic four-wheel-drive setting will easily get you to your destination. And don't worry about slippery launch ramps--just twist a knob to engage 4WD-Lo and ease 'er on up. We'd be surprised if 10 percent of Envoy owners ever took their vehicle on anything worse than a dirt road. But for those who do pleasure in taking their SUV off the beaten path, the Envoy is a capable workhorse that can traverse rough terrain without breaking too much of a sweat. Of course, if you do try crawling over a few rocks, don't be surprised if the runningboards come back looking like pieces of modern art.
Off-Road Performance
Ford Explorer

What is It?
Full-time all-wheel drive. Mode offered: full-time all-wheel drive.

What We Like
Ahhh...the beauty of all-wheel drive: You never have to touch a switch to engage all four wheels, whatever the weather or road conditions. We're impressed with the quick reaction time of Ford's system, especially on gravel roads or wet twisty pavement. With no switches to push or knobs to turn, you just have to trust that the system is doing its job.
What We Don't Like
There's a price to pay for seamless all-weather security: you can't lock the system into a true 4x4 mode, and unlike a living, breathing human, the system can't anticipate the need for 4WD. Need a lot of torque to pull that 24-foot boat out of a slippery launch ramp? Fuhgeddaboudit. Expect high revs and some funky noises from the AWD system as it searches for the wheels with grip. Another AWD issue: the high gear range makes slippery, steep shale hills nearly impassable, as momentum is easily lost while the system figures out where to send power.
How It Works
The V-8, all-wheel-drive combination was introduced in the Explorer nearly 10 years ago, and for the average commuter, Ford's AWD will do the trick in foul weather or whenever the system detects wheelslip. It's one of the most seamless systems on the market, and it reacts almost instantly. Taking the AWD Explorer off-road quickly brought its limitations to light, where the need for constant power to all four wheels, or the added torque of low range can mean the difference between making it over an obstacle and becoming one to the person in the Jeep that's following you.
Off-Road Performance
Jeep Grand Cherokee

What is It?
Quadra-Drive II 4WD system. Modes offered: Auto 4WD, 4-Hi (locked), 4-Lo, and Neutral.

What We Like
The Grand Cherokee provides full-time all-wheel-drive safety and security that's seamless in power application. Unlike its competitors, the Jeep offers robust 4x4 capabilities, with low-range gear selection and transmission perfectly matched to the Hemi's powerband. In addition, the transfer case includes a neutral gearless selection, allowing the Grand Cherokee to be easily towed without the need for an expensive flatbed, or its use as a dinghy behind a motorhome. One small item that really tripped our triggers: the standard front airdam that's removable for extreme rockcrawling, gaining a few more valuable degrees of approach angle.
What We Don't Like
We looked long and hard to find fault with the Grand Cherokee's Quadra-Drive II system, but what's not to like? Jeep is one of the few SUV makers that trail-tests its vehicles in mule stage, and the famed Rubicon Trail is the preferred test arena. The Grand Cherokee's optional Quadra-Drive II is arguably the best 4WD system available in a midsize SUV and is the new standard by which all other four-wheel drives will be compared.
How It Works
In full-time four-wheel drive, the Jeep is just as surefooted as the Explorer on gravel roads or slippery pavement. However, the Grand Cherokee really shines when the asphalt ends and the rutted trail begins. On a Quadra-Drive II-equipped G.C., just pull up on the chrome T-handle to lock the system onto four-by mode, or if you want to tackle the Rubicon's Cadillac Hill, press the 4-Lo button to transform the Grand Cherokee into a mountain goat on steroids.
Cool Stuff
GMC Envoy

What is It?
Auxiliary air pump

What We Like
Blow up those lake toys without making your cheeks red or reinflate tires after a day playing on the sand dunes. The kit includes a hose long enough to reach the front tires and accessory nozzles to fill everything from bike tires to basketballs.
Photo 8/13
What We Don't Like
The pump's small capacity and lack of a storage tank means it'll take a long time to air up tires or large inflatables.
How It Works
Remove the plastic cover on the passenger side of the cargo area, turn the ignition key to the accessory position, and depress the air compressor switch.
Cool Stuff
Ford Explorer

What is It?
Power adjustable pedals

What We Like
People come in all shapes and sizes, and it's oftentimes difficult to find that perfect driving position by seat adjustments alone. Power-adjustable pedals allow another mode of adjustment, bringing the pedals closer or placing them farther away, allowing a broader range of people to be comfortable behind the wheel.
Photo 9/13
What We Don't Like
As Ford doesn't have a lockout for this feature when the Explorer's in gear, it's easy to unintentionally accelerate if your foot is resting against the accelerator while the vehicle's in Drive or Reverse, and you press the switch to move the pedals closer to the driver.
How It Works
Depressing the dash-mounted switch activates an electric actuator, which moves the pedal assembly closer or farther away from the driver's seat.
Cool Stuff
Jeep Grand Cherokee

What is It?
Rear DVD-entertainment system

What We Like
For those long family trips, the DVD player will spin Disney flicks all day long. Or, if the kids bring the Xbox along, you can plug it into the accessory jacks and play until they tire out. Best of all, the system comes with a set of wireless headphones so parents can still listen to tunes on the radio.
Photo 10/13
What We Don't Like
With the system's LCD screen fitted to the headliner, putting it into viewing position obstructs a large portion of the driver's rearward view. We'd prefer to see individual screens in the headrests.
How It Works
Fold down the roof-mounted LCD screen, depress the power button on the console-mounted control panel, and drop in a DVD to play movies, or press the MODE button to activate the accessory jacks to play a video game or share home videos off of your camcorder.
Photo 11/13
How They Stack

Third Place
GMC Envoy SLT
We didn't peg our 2002 Truck of the Year pick to finish dead last in this competition, but the years haven't worn all that well for our Golden Caliper recipient. A couple years ago, it was the best new or significantly updated SUV on the market, but the competition has seen some heavy updates and redesigns, while not much has changed with the Envoy. That said, let's be perfectly clear: The Envoy's still a great vehicle for the market it's intended to serve--middle- to upper-middle-class families. The Envoy's chock full of creature comforts that'll keep Mom, Dad, and the kids happy as the miles ply on down the highway, and it's a consummate hauler of honey-do supplies and trailerable toys. However, we felt the level of quality interior materials, sloppy suspension, and buzzy engine when pulling a load didn't befit the GMC's $42,445 asking price.
Photo 12/13
Second Place
Ford Explorer XLT
Not so long ago, Ford's Explorer would've blazed through our battery of tests and tossed the competitors aside. Not by outright winning every category, but by doing everything asked of it very well. Even with this test, the Ford didn't exhibit any super-strength or hold a smoking gun in any category--it's a well-balanced vehicle that does what's asked of it with nary a complaint. True, the Explorer has its shortcomings, with an underwhelming transmission, more-than-stout suspension tuning, and too many hard interior surfaces where softer materials are needed--thus its midpack status. In our book, with an as-tested-price of $37,690 it's a good buy, but not one we'd make with our own money.
Photo 13/13
First Place
Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited
When we first laid eyes on the redesigned Grand Cherokee, we were disappointed. We expected a look that was more groundbreaking, one that would take the Jeep's icon to a new level. Once behind the wheel, we were reminded that beauty is more than skin deep. The Hemi's thrust, smart-shifting transmission, go-anywhere anytime Quadra-Drive II 4x4 system, and multitasking suspension won the group over. Saddled with a gorgeous interior, stout load-carrying capacity, and accoutrements to keep the family happy, Jeep surely has a winner that'll serve soccer moms and outdoor enthusiasts equally well.

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